Her Tears and Soul on Wings

Tears. A soul on wings.

Um, excuse me. What exactly are you talking about here?

There is a link. Yes, I can prove it. And yes, I am obscure.

Both are lines within the poem Silver Drops, written by Raymond Alexander Kukkee of the blog Incoming Bytes. Thank-you Raymond for lending your poem to me for my analysis.

Silver Drops  

She stands, motionless, laughing inside at her own sadness,

Entrancing darkness glowing from her eyes,

For the possibility of ever nothing

Comes upon her with breathless lips

Rending her endearing cry silent

Tears of melted silver, droplets of unrequited love

Carry her voice and very pledge of love to sky

Lift her soul on wings to heavens beyond,

For all to see and wonder,

Sorrowful laughter borne on the winds

Far to Eternity

© 2002 Raymond Alexander Kukkee

The images are rich with descriptors such as “tears of melted silver.”  I picture her tears falling into her cup of chamomile tea, tears becoming immersed and milky in the tea. One drop at a time. Slowly.

The salt of the tears serve a constant reminder of her unrequited love. She alone serves a constant reminder of her sadness. He does not appear at her side.

Silver Drops mixes sorrow and tears with laughter and soul. The laughter is a surprising ingredient within the poem. A dash of sugar, a cup of giggle.

Laughter takes on different qualities in different contexts. There are times when we laugh at ourselves. Or we choose not to laugh, horrified by the thought of doing so when we are sad.

Sometimes we laugh hysterically after a sad event, or smile awkwardly during a funeral. Emotions can rise in an instant, and they are not always considered ‘suitable’ for the occasion. Whether a formal affair or semi-casual, our emotions do not always fit the recommended wardrobe.

Sad Silhouette

Her love is unrequited

The reader’s heart aches for the woman in the poem. The silence that replaces her cry is heavy yet emptiness itself carries no weight.

Forward to the poem’s conclusion, as her soul rises up to the sky.  We share a sky and many of us share the experience of longing for someone who does not feel the same emotions for us. We can identify.

This is christyb, I’m listening

Do you think this poem would have been different if told from the perspective of a man whose love is not returned? Would he have responded the same as the woman described in the poem?


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26 thoughts on “Her Tears and Soul on Wings

  1. simon7banks

    That is a beautiful poem, with the sound of the lines contributing to the depth of meaning. A phrase that fascinated me, and that you didn’t highlight, is “Entrancing darkness glowing”.

    I think reversing the genders would make it different. There is a sense not only of loss, loneliness and sadness, but of beauty and mystery. Men, at least poetically-inclined men, often see women as mysterious and sometimes as beautiful! I don’t get the impression women often see men as mysterious, maybe because they’ve often borne them as sons. I’m assuming Raymond Alexander is a man.

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    1. christyb Post author

      Good observations Simon. The glow of darkness is a spooky image that makes the reader want to continue on… I am glad it caught your eye as well. Ah yes, you have a poetic mind, tone, and a wonderful way of explaining the genre.
      christyb

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  2. Raymond alexander kukkee

    @ Christy B, I see you ARE listening. Thank you for featuring “Silver Drops”! Much appreciated! I have always regarded women as special, beautiful, and mysterious beings. Simon is certainly right — the reverse may not be true, women may not see men in the same light. I am very interested in seeing how others respond too. Thanks, Simon!
    Thanks so much, Christy! ~R

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    1. christyb Post author

      Your positive comments are so nice to hear Raymond. I am honored you invited me to analyze your poem and I admire your writing ability. Women and men may react differently to situations, however I love that we can collaborate to discuss poetry.
      christyb

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  3. M. J. Joachim

    I see a poem of brokenness and healing, a love much grander and far more intense than romantic love between a man and a woman. This is the story of a woman’s journey through life. Oh, Raymond, do forgive me if this was not your original intent. I believe poetry speaks to each individual differently, and this is how it is speaking to me.

    Your poem validates the claim that love conquers all. It silences the disbeliever into obscurity, leaving its captor victorious and undefeated, regardless of those who would see its undoing.

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    1. christyb Post author

      Wonderful. M.J. you have shed new light to the ‘darkness’ that Raymond describes in the poem. Love is uplifting yet can be emotionally damaging. Your ability to disect the poem and give it your own take keeps me inspired to keep writing posts and enjoying this blog.
      christyb

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  4. Raymond alexander kukkee

    @ M. J., that is an interesting interpretation, and that POV does validate the power involved in love beyond romance. Poetry does speak to individuals on a very personal basis. Depending on one’s POV, there may also be additional suggestions … Thanks, M.J. ! ~R

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  5. Marc Phillippe Babineau

    Hey – I LOVE the “this is Christyb, I’m listening” part! Make it more of a stand alone (more space above and below, nearer the bottom, maybe a side-bar too) – great ideas like that bear fruit in searching for a fellowship of the rings, for the bell tolls for those who yearn to hear it (i’m tryin’ to say, more readers, more retweets, more readers, advertiser interest) – that’s one good attraction, and a few more ingenious additions like that and you’ll be called “Green” (if you know Canadian TV shows based on duct tape, you’ll know what I mean!).

    Great job!

    Looking forward to a new post… talent shouldn’t be squandered nor hoarded, but given freely!

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    1. christyb Post author

      Thanks Marc! The ‘I’m listening’ line has been in a few of my posts now and I think it suits me. Your vote of confidence is delightful. You share your mentoring abilities with ease and style, your giving abilities are endless and appreciated.

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  6. Pingback: Tears of Laughter « InnerDialect

  7. Thomas Davis

    Good poem, good analysis. When a poem is treated seriously it gains in meaning and stature. That’s why I like this site. Some of the images in Raymond’s poem, as you note in your analysis, have a sensitive, romantic edge that enhances the poem’s grace. Good work.

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    1. Christy Post author

      Thank-you Thomas, both for enjoying the posts and for your kind words. This post is one of my favourites so far. The sadness is so clear and there were so many images to play with in my analysis. Plus, it was nice to work with a friend. Have a wonderful evening.

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  8. Pingback: Outside Of The Box | Poetic Parfait

  9. Kavita Joshi

    such a deep and heartfelt poem dear Christy…love the way you can express the feelings in the web of words with beauty and grace…I could see the person in the poem as real with each line I was reading and could feel the connection straight away…thanks for sharing this beautiful work dear

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