A Question about Poetic Motivation

Because Sometimes I Don’t Want to Explain My Poetry Motivation

A Question about Poetic Motivation

What does this poem mean, exactly? Photo via Poetic Parfait.

Here’s what I’m thinking. Here’s what inspired me. Wait, it’s about poetry motivation.

Yesterday, I read a post by ladysighs about the Birth of a Poem. Check it out and follow her blog if you haven’t already as there are always interesting reflections and poems there! Okay, back to her post. She explained that sometimes it is difficult to understand a poem and when that happens she would like to know the writer’s intention behind the lines or poetry motivation.

I wrote in my comment on her post that:

Sometimes I write the explanations to my poems at the bottom of the posts. I donโ€™t always do it though because I like to read how people interpret them.

As a poet, I like sometimes to see howย you the readers interpret my lines. Sometimes your comments tell me that you totally get my poetry motivation or my intention. Other times, you say something totally different than what I was thinking or point out an aspect of the poem that I hadn’t even thought about. And I like that!

I actually love it when readers point out what they make of the poem and how certain lines speak to them. When those perceptions are different than what I had in mind as my fingers moved over the keyboard during the creation phase, well, I get a kick out of that. It’s fun to experiment with words and see how the end product is perceived by readers.

So, sometimes I write the explanations for my poems at the bottom of blog posts, as I did in A Toast to the New Year. Other times, nah; instead, I just leave it open to reader interpretation.

What are your thoughts? Do you like when poetsย explain the motivation behind their words?
 
 
ยฉ2015 Christy Birmingham

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150 thoughts on “Because Sometimes I Don’t Want to Explain My Poetry Motivation

  1. Maria F.

    I think I just goofed when I posted a poem today, because I precisely stated my motivation for writing the poem. Now I’m doubtful as to whether to leave that alone and just let it flow.

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    1. Maria F.

      As to the question: “Do you like when poets explain the motivation behind their words?” I would say yes, if there is complexity or something unclear. As to what I recently wrote, I felt I had to mention the pattern of growth of the Agave plant (in a post preceding the poem), so I think it does help at times. Nevertheless, the dictionary is always at hand, and if the poet doesn’t feel like explaining, he/she has the right not to do so, as with the dictionary you can look up words that you may not understand. Just my 2 cents.

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  2. Charlene Woodley

    Love this Christy! You and I have been on the same page with this concept since day one! Sometimes I explain (before the actual post of poem), but I am always glad to see the perspective and outlook of the reader – you just happen to be one of my favorite interpreters). Great post! ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Charlene, okay seeing you here today totally makes me giddy happy! Sometimes I feel if it’s an interesting backstory to the poem that I’ll put it in but other times I delight in what readers think it all means – by the way I hope you’re still writing poems xx

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        1. Charlene Woodley

          I know you’re not pressuring, but I hope you realize how much I appreciate the little push ๐Ÿ™‚ …I need it and am always encouraged and inspired because of you. Thank you, dear Christy! โค

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  3. Janine Huldie

    Not a poet myself, but even with writing in general part of the fun is when I hit publish and see the comments rolling in and just how my readers can relate on some greater level. So totally get it!! ๐Ÿ˜‰

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  4. madamebovary

    Creo que el texto literario se explica por sรญ mismo, cuanto mรกs el poema, que es pura emociรณn y expresiรณn รญntima del poeta. No quiero conocer la intenciรณn del artista, no quiero una traducciรณn no poรฉtica; prefiero saborear tu (“mi”) poema, y saber que provoca una polifonรญa de lecturas e interpretaciones. Saludos.

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  5. Ben Naga

    There are two quotations of John Ciardi’s that I particularly like.

    “Poetry lies its way to the truth. ”

    and (especially)

    “A poem is a machine for making choices.”

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  6. Mark

    Great post Christy! I so agree that sometimes adding the motivation is a good thing and other times just put the poetry out there and wait to see how others may interpret it. I know sometimes my motivation for a poem or story may come from a very raw, painful and intimate place that I am not ready to announce or share with the world.

    So it is always intriguing when the words touch someone else in a profound way. We are all really not so different, each of us fighting our own battles. Sharing the emotions which can allow us to connect even if we don’t always know the exact cause that precipitated them can bring healing.

    As always you make me think, thank you for that. Have a great weekend and stay dry, looks like a we are going to have a wet couple of days here in the Pacific Northwest. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hi Mark, great point you make that sometimes the inspiration for the poem is so raw that we don’t want to explain it. Been there many times. You totally made my day when I saw the reblog so thanks again for that. As for weather, soooo much rain today and was really windy this morning! Aren’t we supposed to be milder on the West coast? hehe! Have a great night ๐Ÿ™‚

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  7. Mark

    Reblogged this on Maleko's Art and commented:
    Beautiful and thought provoking post from Christy B. about why we sometimes share the motivation or inspiration behind a piece and why sometimes we don’t. Inspiration comes from many different places and interpretation is often an individual endeavor unique to each of us and our own situations.

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  8. simon7banks

    As a reader, I certainly find it interesting, but I prefer to read the poem first and then – maybe some time later – hear what the poet has to say about it. The exception is a brief factual note, for example explaining who a minor historical figure was.

    As a poet I try to follow this. I’ve included some analysis of my own poems, but it’s been posted after the poem’s text, either straight after in the same post or more often, in a later post with the poem repeated.

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Simon, you in particular often fascinate me with the explanations of why you wrote your poems or what inspired you. Usually if I do make an explanation of a poem then I put it deliberately after the poem rather than before it so that readers already have an idea in their minds of what I am writing about (or so they think, until they read the explanation!!)

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  9. balroop2013

    Hi Christy,

    I think the beauty of poetry lies in its interpretation and all readers have a different eye. It is interesting to note how your thoughts are understood by others, how the imagery is assimilated by them and how many emotions it can evoke. Therefore stating what the poem is about is limiting the possibilities of enjoying its aspects. I always leave my poems open ended and many have been viewed differently than the idea i had at the time of writing.

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Thank you Balroop for sharing your perspective here. It’s so intriguing to me how two people have different takeaways of the same poem and, I suppose, the differing analyses tells us a bit about each of those readers!

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  10. Poetsmith

    As for poetry, I think it should left for the reader to interpret and to seek a poetic experience… Thanks for this thought provoking post, Christy. ๐Ÿ™‚ Best wishes and have a great weekend! Iris

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  11. Cyan Ryan

    I like it, and I also like explaining, but so few people comment on my blogs asking, or saying what they think I meant, except for awesome Aquileana! I know I am a difficult read though, so I understand.

    I often mean 2 or 3 different things in what I write though, and I’m often curious if other people picks up on the actually intended different interpretations. I’ve found that posting less frequently allows people to keep up with me more easily, and I have been getting more comments in light of that change, so it may be something that with time I get to enjoy discussing more than I have in the past. I think I mentioned that in a comment to you already, sorry if that was redundant.

    Getting more connected with the social aspect of WordPress has been more fun lately, and been changing my overall experience with WordPress, which before, was primarily a means to renew my commitment to writing, among other goals. Anyways, I will check out the blogger you recommended!

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hi Ry,
      If you want to post less then perhaps you could save posts as drafts as the ideas come to you. That’s what I often do. Also, so great to hear you are getting into the community feel of WordPress. That’s half the fun for me as I love the connections I make on blogs. Well, if you want me to ask you questions about your posts then I will start. Hehe ๐Ÿ™‚

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      1. Cyan Ryan

        That would be great, ask away my friend!

        I suppose I could do that. I have done that a few times earlier this January, but decided what I wrote was more hobby interest, and not the kind of thing people would want to read. I will experiment with research posts in the future, I’m sure, whether or not I think they are post-worthy!

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        1. Christy Birmingham Post author

          Experimenting is all part of it. That’s how I figure out what my blog’s readers like or not. Plus, look at what tags in your dashboard seem to be most popular or which posts get the most comments. If those kinds of posts are ones you also like writing then you’re on the right track ๐Ÿ™‚ Okay, questions will come your way soon then! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  12. rollyachabotbooks

    Hi Christy… Poets are deep thinkers and they can take their readers into an entirely new realm of understanding. I do like to read and evaluate the feeling of who is writing. Sometimes it allows a deep insight in the heart of the writer. You are gifted as a poet, I admire that in anyone who can write with such freedom. Keep em guessing Christy…

    Hugs

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      I write deeply Rolly but sometimes nobody knows what I mean, hehe! Well, it’s flattering to hear you think I’m doing well. I like to learn from what I read too and your books are some of how I learn about faith so thank you for that!

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  13. ladysighs

    Thank you Christi. I am glad I gave you something to blog about. ๐Ÿ™‚ I can see a lot of bloggers think about this too. As pointed out, there is no right and wrong about adding a little bit of background to the why and what of a post/poem. I think using one’s gut feeling is probably the best. If it fits add, if not don’t.

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  14. D.G.Kaye

    Interesting post thanks for sharing Christy. Yes, I’d imagine sometimes the writer would like the reader to know the intent of his/her words. But the element of curiousity would abound, wondering what the reader’s perception of the words mean. It’s a catch 22. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  15. Veronica

    No, Christy. No quiero conocer la inspiraciรณn ni la motivaciรณn del autor. Quiero “apropiarme” de la obra sin ruidos ni condiciones.
    Un beso grande and happy weekend! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  16. Raymond Alexander Kukkee

    I think this is one of your most interesting posts, Christyb, because you have such a unique point of view in your poetry. Sometimes I get them immediately, more often I have to think about the interpretation for a while–ponder the motivation, etc. which is a good thing, it challenges the creative mind.

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        1. Christy Birmingham Post author

          One commenter here said “sometimes itโ€™s disappointing when you realise the interpretation you made wasnโ€™t actually correct.” I thought that was interesting. Poetry has beauty from any angle and is my faithful companion.

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  17. Andrea Stephenson

    People will always make their own interpretation – sometimes it’s disappointing when you realise the interpretation you made wasn’t actually correct. But at the same time, it can be good to learn about what inspired someone to create those words.

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  18. Aquileana

    I like to see which the intentions of the poet or writer were… So I am in for an explanation as far as it it not exhaustive but subtle and open, not linear somehow… As to Lady Sighs’ poem I love her post in which she suggestively explained what she meant to say and which were her main ideas!… Best wishes and Friday hugs Christy -Pie. Aquileana ๐Ÿ˜€

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hi Aqui-pie! I think that you are so clever and often see the deeper levels in poems. You are an excellent reader for doing that and writers such as myself (especially me!) appreciate that ๐Ÿ™‚

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  19. Dave Small

    Thanks for the great post Christy.

    At times it’s helpful to have poetry explained since I’m a novice. But many times explanations can dilute the overall effect. Even if I understand “more” sometimes I end up understanding less.

    What came to mind as I read your post was a couple lines from the poet Czeslaw Milosz:
    One clear stanza (of poetry) can take more weight
    Than a whole wagon of elaborate prose.

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hi Dave, welcome to the site and great to read your comment! I think when you leave a post that provides an interpretation of a poem with more questions than you had before you read that post, that is more a reflection of the writer of the interpretation than of you!

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  20. Mike

    I believe in leaving it for the reader to interpret Christy. As you correctly point out, many readers latch on to a new angle that even the writer hadn’t seen and this is both instructive for the poet and fun. I have only once felt obliged to give an explanation of an obscure reference that would have been understood by only the most zealous of Irish scholars – but I even tried to use an alternative reference before I resorted to that.

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  21. irinadim

    I enjoyed your thoughts, Christy, as well as ladysighs’. I don’t always understand someone’s poem, so a few explanatory words by the author would add to my appreciation of the poem. As for me, my poems in general are easy to understand, but sometimes I add a note about what prompted me to write a particular poem. Cheers ๐Ÿ™‚ Irina

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  22. john flanagan

    Christy, i avoid as much as possible ‘explaining’ my writing to anyone, each reader has the freedom to interpret and i feel that’s the way it should be. i’m polite some someone asks for an explanation but i usually don’t say much or give one..and it’s the reason, too, i don’t use tags much if at all, they lead in a certain direction and sometimes mislead.
    Thank you for sharing this worthwhile offering.

    Big hugs

    john

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  23. Clanmother

    It is no small feat to be a poet. It is a demanding calling and one that imposes stringent parameters. This quote comes to mind:
    โ€œA poet’s work . . . to name the unnamable, to point at frauds, to take sides, start arguments, shape the world and stop it from going to sleep.” Salman Rushdie

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  24. Stephen Thom

    all art is a conversation ๐Ÿ™‚ once a piece is out there it is as much the reader’s as it is your own. ๐Ÿ™‚ it all subjective and the way you see something could be completely different to the way i see it. it’s interactive and nourishing and helps us to shape and express how we make sense of the world ๐Ÿ™‚

    that being said…there are clearly circumstances where you might want your reader to take away a fairly set message. if you look at something like exhaustive dvd commentaries…to kinda cross-compare, for example, then at these times a little nudging in the right direction seems not much if it helps convey your message, and as aquileana has noted can help to expand and enhance your experience…again coming back to the conversation element

    good bit of fence sitting by me there, but i would say for myself, definitely more often than not being open to interpretation allows for a more interactive, involving, subjective experience

    great post, you’ve got a lot of interesting opinions and feedback in this thread ๐Ÿ™‚

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  25. Maria F.

    There could be a certain “courtesy” I guess, from the blogger, to consider “age differences” and the length of the poems. At my age, I prefer not to be bombarded with rock videos, unless they’re from the 1960’s or something I’m familiar with. So instead of going with videos that are more universal, some poets go with their personal preferences, disregarding the culture or age group they are addressing. I don’t know if this is what they call “freedom of speech”, or whatever, but there seems to be a total disregard to readers on this matter. As to the length of poems, I guess poets who write so much and so long are apparently trying to appeal to a certain group of people, so I stay away from those also because I don’t feel part of that group, and it’s also amazing that they actually think I have the time (or the eyesight) to read on and on. I guess I’m the one who needs to more flexible? I don’t know.

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    1. Maria F.

      All I can say is that I’m comfortable with shorter poems, in which I don’t have to “dig in” to find out who the characters really where, because then it becomes a “novella”, and those I can read in Kindle.

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      1. Christy Birmingham Post author

        Maria, interesting comments here, thank you! It was nice, by the way, to see your poetry on your recent post. As to who the audience is, honestly, I don’t think of that when I write a poem. If I think of the audience then I don’t get to the heart of the concept of my poem, I find. I am instead true to my moment, myself, and that is what ultimately motivates my creative works.

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        1. Maria F.

          Well, there are poems for children, and there are poems for adults; I assume we are speaking of adults here, but the First Amendment (Amendment I) to the United States Constitution states freedom of speech for all mediums, including the internet, but how does one “filter” content one does not want to see or hear, has been an issue for all democratic countries, just, how MUCH I can say, for my sake, or for my children’s, if such were the case. I think I do in a way have to define an audience, but that’s just me.

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        2. Maria F.

          I’m not criticizing democracy, but extreme capitalism, which seeks to make money no matter how, and that includes the internet and what one sees and reads there.

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  26. Rajagopal

    Like a painting or sculpture, poetry and various forms of fiction are works of art, so the creator giving his version is an unwanted encroachment in the territory of the reader; the writer and the reader are two different entities with their exclusive rights. As soon as a work of art leaves the creator’s hands, it belongs to the public, not by way of copyright, but in its appreciation, which is the exclusive preserve of the audience. In a nutshell, the creator’s task gets over upon completion of a work of art and thereafter it moves to the domain of the audience. So Christy, just write your piece and leave it to fly on its own….

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Leaving the creative work to spread its wings and fly is a glorious image, Raj! Whether it be painting, poem, dance or music, that piece of work is enhanced when it is publically shared. You have such an eloquent way of writing, my friend!

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  27. Andrew

    Sometimes as a poet, I barely understand the meaning of what I wrote so explaining it would be very difficult. Very often a reader will tell me what they got out of my writing, leaving me a bewildered as I didn’t recall saying anything like what the read read.

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  28. Tricia Drammeh

    I enjoy reading poetry for the sake of poetry, but it’s always interesting to find out what inspired to poet to write what he or she wrote. I don’t think every poem needs an explanation, though. Art doesn’t always need to be explained.

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  29. Letizia

    The meaning is perhaps somewhere in between, where the author’s intentions meet the reader’s desires. That’s why poetry feels so personal (to the author but also to the reader) – we all bring something to it. Another great post, C!

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  30. vivachange77

    Often I choose poetry because it would too convoluted to write my thoughts in prose. I like the economy of poetry that pushes me to be clear and direct with words.To me it adds value to my poetry when other people see things in it that differ from my original concept.

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  31. The Chaos Realm

    I relate to them, but it’s hard to explain sometime (even for this avid reader). Once, I was teaching, and I asked my little middle school kiddies what they thought this poem meant, and this kid nailed it with this analysis that was graduate-level. And I told him so, of course. This is why I find the school system here so disheartening…so many undiscovered, unencouraged jewels of intellect…everybody has something…

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      I bet that moment with the middle school child was both a delight and a surprise! Indeed, everyone is good at something but sometimes traditional education can’t factor in certain attributes that are actually quite useful after graduation. Totally get what you mean!

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  32. Jack Flacco

    That’s the wonderful beauty of poetry. There are so many interpretations beyond the author’s original intent. And that’s what also makes a good poem–to be able to write a piece that others might think it had everything to do with how they felt, instead of reading it for how the author intended.

    Great post, Christy!

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      YES. It’s like I read last night in a book about the wonderful moment when you hear a song and it is like the singer is speaking right to you because the lyrics fit you exactly at that moment. That’s what you’re saying but as it relates to poetry. Full circle moment here. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  33. Kev

    I find that while it’s nice to know what a poet’s inspiration is behind a particular poem, it’s best left to one’s own interpretation. We all bring our own into whatever we read and it’s interesting to see how people differ in their interpretations. So much better that way and sometimes you get that, “Yes, I can see that, but I never thought of it that way!” and it takes on a whole new meaning… Our interpretations are what bring poetry to life. ๐Ÿ™‚

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      1. Kev

        What really makes it interesting is when you re-read a poem years later and find a completely new meaning while still retaining the other. ๐Ÿ™‚

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  34. Deborah

    When I read this, I was thinking that if one is having trouble finding ‘the’ meaning of a poem, maybe discuss it with a couple other like minds, rather than trying to get to the poet for an answer. Because, even though it’s not the same thing, many professions have some kind of “motivation” that keeps them going, trying new things, and moving on. For me, when I’m doing more creative things, I can’t always say what the motivation is for how things turn out. In other words, sometimes, I create the meaning even for myself. So it’s sort of difficult to explain it to someone else. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hi Deb, how wonderful to see you! I think I can relate to what you mean as sometimes I am deep into writing a poem and words come to my mind that don’t at first translate for me as to the connection… until it’s done and then I realize what association my mind had made. Oh the brain, it’s so complex!

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  35. Jeri Walker-Bickett (@JeriWB)

    I like both ways, but supposed I would rather read a poet’s explanation after reading the poem rather than before. Teaching poetry is a lot of fun, but I especially like how students will read one and not want to re-read it, because you only need to read something once right? But with poetry (and many other dense forms of writing) the joy often comes in the re-reading.

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  36. plared

    Toda obra se basa en el intento de exteriorizar algo. De expresar lo que llevamos dentro, tanto lo que anhelamos como lo que nos destruye o en ese momento nos invade la cabeza.

    Si ademas conseguimos conectar con otros que entiendan lo que decimos. O que libremente lo interpreten a su manera…..Sinceramente, se habrรก conseguido todo objetivo que consciente o inconscientemente hayamos imaginado. Cuidate

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  37. Indah Susanti

    As a reader, of course I would love to know what is the motivation and intention of the poet – especially when the poet provides no explanations. And actually, in my humble opinion, that’s actually the attraction of the art. The art that makes people think and wander attracts more… Best wishes Christy and looking forward to read your poems again! ๐Ÿ™‚

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  38. jagxs

    โ€œEl escritor escribe su libro para explicarse a sรญ mismo lo que no se puede explicar.โ€

    Gabriel Garcรญa Mรกrquez

    You are right. Explains about what do you mean in a poem, it’s really trouble. Everyone think into itself circumstances.

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  39. PreciousRhymes

    My experience has been similar Christy. The interpretation of poetry (although any from of writing/communication is subject to this) is very personal and is often governed by where our heart stands in this school of life; The view from another window is sometimes even more beautiful than what I can see from mine ๐Ÿ™‚

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  40. macjam47

    This question can be answered either way. No. I like to make my own interpretation of the poem, but yes, I like to hear the poet’s intention. That’s the funny thing about poetry – it can be interpreted differently by several readers. That being said, if the clarity is lacking, then I really appreciate the author’s interpretation, or better yet, a question that helps the reader channel his/her thoughts in the right direction. ๐Ÿ™‚

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      It’s neat to find out what the writer’s thoughts were when he or she composed the poem – especially when we think it is referring to something completely different ๐Ÿ™‚ Thanks, Michelle, and always nice to see you!

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  41. cav12

    I think poems are personal journeys for the poet and reader. And as you mentioned, we each interpret poems according to our experiences and cultural backgrounds. I believe it makes reading poetry a much richer and enjoyable experience. ๐Ÿ˜€

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  42. JunkChuck

    I was at a reading several years ago by a wildly talented but only marginally known (like most poets, come to think of it) poet who, upon finishing the session with a long, romantic, visceral, rhythmic tour do force accepted a few questions. The first guy to speak stood up and began his question with a long, descriptive diatribe on his thoughts and ideas, referencing gender inequity and futility and “self-immolation of romantic fallacies”–(there were some fire metaphors) about this poem before he said “is this what your intent was when you sat down to write?”

    The poet sort of smiled, then folded her hands in her lap and said “I was just writing fucking.”

    Sorry it that’s inappropriate here, but when I’m writing it it resonated with me. My best poem is about my wife once kissing me so hard our teeth clinked together–it was startling and it hurt but it was the first time I absolutely understood she felt what I felt–but the poem, it’s just about kissing goodbye on a cold day. I think it’s usually better not to tell anyone what you’re thinking when you write–it really limits the boundaries of the relationship they can have with your words.

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hehe your comment about the poet, makes me laugh! Here the reader had gone to great lengths to analyze the text and it wasn’t even like that in the end ๐Ÿ™‚ The poet probably thought, “Well I guess that’s cool that there’s deeper levels here too” ๐Ÿ™‚

      I like that moment you describe where you realized your wife cared so much about you because of the “teeth” incident. It’s very sweet and I bet the poem is nicely done. In that case, in my opinion, the message behind it would add to the poem so much in terms of trying to analyze the poet’s motivation. However, as you explain, telling readers that intention limits what those readers feel as they read the poem.

      Thank you for adding to the dialogue here. Have you shared the poem on your blog?

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  43. "A Curious Mind"

    I like it when a poem is left open for interpretation. Everyone relates differently, interprets differently, see’s it through their own eyes. Myself, I don’t want to spoil that.

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  44. Marie Lavender

    I agree. Leaving it open to interpretation might be better. It’s like the teachers in school who always insisted they knew what the long dead poet was thinking. I always thought, “Really? Where is your time machine?” LOL.

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hehe well when I post analyses posts on this site about those older poets you can’t just skip over them ๐Ÿ™‚ I don’t always want to explain my motivations but I like figuring out what motivates others ๐Ÿ˜€

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  45. Chris

    Do I like when poets explain the motivation behind their words?

    Nah, I donโ€™t think I like it one little bit.

    Far too many endeavors in my life have been guided by others. When it comes to the simple pleasure of interpreting a poem, please give me the freedom to fail miserably.

    A poetโ€™s words might spark any number of unintended responses in my mind, and therein is the beauty of poetry; I am free to be misguided without the fear of crashing and burning.

    Perhaps, somewhere amid the mild electrochemical reactions and frantic motor neuron firings of my brain, an ultimate truth does lie.

    Let me find it on my own, and please donโ€™t erect a carnival ride โ€œheight checkerโ€ that tells me that Iโ€™m too short to read your poem.

    PS

    Thanks for stopping by my website, so I could discover yours. You have many wonderful musings here.

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    1. Christy Birmingham Post author

      Hehe Chris, your comment about the ‘height checker’ had me thinking your personality rocks and that you’ll be a good fit here. Some of the posts are ‘unique’ in tone, especially my original poems. I’m glad I found your blog, although I can’t recall what led me there, you know how that goes in blogland. I am glad to read your comment and see you visit here – have a great weekend and chat more soon!

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  46. Chris

    In all seriousness, I suppose a little background could help sometimes.

    Especially, when I remember an episode of the Sopranos when Meadow had to explain Robert Frost’s “Stopping by Woods on a Snowy Evening” to AJ.

    Poor AJ thought it was a poem about Thanksgiving, man how I miss that show.

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  47. JL0073

    I think every poem and every poem is different. Some are better left ambiguous and some benefit from a little more enlightening. It’s up to the poet if they want to clarify something. Poetry is a very delicate thing and usually the goal is for the poem to speak for itself and let the reader decide, it reall depends. It’s an interesting thing to think about. Great post.

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