Book Review: Sweet Sorrow by Tricia Drammeh

Young Adult Fiction Book Cover

Sweet Sorrow by Tricia Drammeh

Sometimes a book comes across your path that challenges you in a way you never saw coming. Such was the case with the young adult novel Sweet Sorrow by Tricia Drammeh. Let me explain what I mean in my latest book review.

The main character is a teenage girl named Rowan who loves to act and gets the role as Juliet in her high school’s production of Romeo and Juliet. When Eddie, the ex-football player she is crushing on, gets the part of Romeo, she tries to keep her cool, only it’s not so easy to do, especially with the dark secret she has in her past. She also has many questions about Eddie, who seems so mysterious and might have a troubled past. Don’t worry; I won’t spill the secrets, just in case you want to read Sweet Sorrow soon.

And I do hope you’ll read the book, I really do. As I explained earlier, it challenged me. When I realized why Rowan was so closed off from having a new boyfriend, whether it be Eddie or anyone else, after she broke up with Mark, the book really hit home.

I won’t give away the reason why Rowan is keeping to herself about her breakup with Mark, as I don’t like being a spoiler of book secrets, but I will say that sometimes relationships can go down very destructive paths. I admit to having some bad flashbacks when I read this book because of an unhealthy romantic relationship I had. I’m not saying that to scare anyone out of the book but instead to say that it was a read that I had to pace myself through and it might be the same way for you too, depending on your experiences.

And it was worth the effort as Tricia Drammeh is a writer capable of creating characters that seem to be very much alive and real. If she weren’t such a good writer, then I wouldn’t have been emotionally moved by Sweet Sorrow. It’s that simple.

If you want to read this book or give it to a teen, Sweet Sorrow is on Amazon. Feel free to read more of my book reviews too if you’re interested in what else I’ve read lately.

So, tell me, do you read young adult literature?

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69 thoughts on “Book Review: Sweet Sorrow by Tricia Drammeh

  1. Billybuc

    I’m sorry, Christy, I don’t read young adult….don’t know anyone who does….but I value your opinion and I’ll file this away in case anyone asks me for a recommendation.

    Have a great week!

    hugs,
    bill

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  2. ghostwritingplus

    Great review, Christy! And the book cover is very pretty. Yes, my favorite books are YA. The Harry Potter series. The Lois Lowry books (The Giver, Messenger, Gathering Blue). Holes, by Louis Sachar. I also enjoy kids’ books like the Sammy Keyes series and Bunnicula. Have a lovely day!

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      1. Christy B Post author

        Hi G 🙂 I like Lois Lowry books and I believe they are children’s books. But sometimes it’s hard to classify books by genre and you’ve just illustrated this point (I get confused too on a few books so don’t worry!). I thought you’d like YA fiction too given the Minecraft series xx

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  3. Jeri Walker (@JeriWB)

    I’ve read some YA, mainly related to finding books for students, and I do enjoy the genre personally from time to time. I’m intrigued by how you set us up here to want to know the reason why Rowan was closed off to a new relationship. They ways us humans make choices never ceases to fascinate me.

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  4. Sue Dreamwalker

    This sounds a very romantic read Christy with the ups and downs which come within relationships.. I was all into romantic novels in my early years and would have been just the type of book I would have then chosen to read
    Great review my friend.. And This reminds me from your review and your own experiences how not all romances are romantic.. Which makes me doubly proud of you dear Christy and can see why this book came your way..
    Love to you my sweet friend
    Sue ❤

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    1. Christy B Post author

      So true that ups and downs are part of relationships, whether they are romantic, friends, or others. Oh sweet Sue, thank you for appreciating my growth and vulnerability in this post. Much love to you ♥ Are you in the garden this weekend?

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  5. Tricia Drammeh

    Thank you for such a thoughtful review, Christy. My experiences are different from Rowan’s, but I did end up in a very dark place after writing the book. It dredged up some bad memories for me, but I hope the book will educate or help other young women. I so appreciate the review.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Thanks Tricia for your openness and ability to share experiences with us through your fiction. Would you be interested in writing a guest post at my blog When Women Inspire about using Sweet Sorrow to help young women? No pressure, only if you want to xx

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    1. Christy B Post author

      You are so beautiful, Cyndi 🙂 Oh, I tried twice to leave a comment at Pictimilitude over the past week and go an error message. Maybe something is off on your dashboard? Not sure if it’s my computer or your comment plugin?

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  6. Dee

    I don’t read young adult literature but I will be sure to pass this review on should someone ask me about the book. I love the way you gave hints to the book’s content, it makes you want to read the book.

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  7. Rajagopal

    I stopped reading fiction since long ago. Nonetheless, I like the way you introduce a talented writer to egg interested readers on to the book. As for the way the story resonated with memories of events in your own life, take heart Christy in the fact that we are all in-formed energies floating around cosmos programmed to interface with other forms and experiences trending to an unknown larger purpose. It may be a lot of good, and some bad, or vice versa. But let it be. Cheers…

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Hi Raj, I appreciate your take time to read about the book given you don’t delve into fiction anymore. I understand what you mean about being informed energies.. Your point is well taken, and I thank you for it.

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  8. vivachange77

    To answer your question, I don’t often read young adult fiction. I loved the Book Thief and passed it on to my grandchildren. Your review speaks from your understanding. I think young adults will be drawn to read Sweet Sorrow.

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  9. Bun Karyudo

    It’s not really the kind of book I would ordinarily read, but your review of it seemed clear and fair. I do have a niece who might enjoy it, so if she’s on the lookout for suggestions…

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      1. Bun Karyudo

        Haha! I was wondering if there might be a hint in a later paragraph about the girl’s (I’m afraid I can’t remember her name offhand) dark secret. It was a short review, so I kept on going to find out. Perhaps I should read YA books since I’m clearly interested to know what happens next.

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  10. Ste J

    YA books is something often neglected in my own house but that needs to and will change, this sounds like something I could get a lot out of and also one that will challenge my perspectives as well. Another one for the Amazon list it is then, it seems we are trying to outgrow each others book pile hehe.

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  11. Resa

    You’ve given this book by Tricia Drammeh a lovely review!
    Oddly enough, I have a new book to read, and it is in the young adult genre. It is titled “Shalilly”. It’s written by Elizabeth Gracen, a friend of mine. She was Miss America in the very late 80’s & the star in a TV series I designed the costumes for in 1998. (Highlander, the Raven)
    So, I will soon find out how like the genre! TY for the review, Christy! {{Hugs}}

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Oh how great about your upcoming YA read, Resa. I look forward to reading the review 🙂 Hugs to you too!! Thanks again for the support with “Poetic Paint” xx

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