Quote about Women

Have You Heard of the Hellfire Club? The Lot of Women in Georgian England (Guest Post)

Here with me today is historical romance author Shehanne Moore. We go back a ways, Shey and I, so when I heard about her new book The Writer and the Rake, I asked her to come visit the blog. She kindly agreed to write a guest post, and, wow, she has provided quite a read about Georgian England, women, and the writing process. Now, let’s give Shehanne Moore the stage.

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Let’s be clear here, this is not a paean of praise to Francis Dashwood’s exclusive club for high society rakes.  When meetings often included mock rituals, items of a pornographic nature, much drinking, wenching and banqueting, what kind of a person do you think I am? And while the hero of my latest book has every selfish reason to appear enlightened about women, he has a point. Women were not able to walk into a tavern and drink in these days, the way they do now. In fact, a woman’s lot in 1765 was one to die for and not as we have come to know that term either.

Firstly, let me thank this very special woman, Christy Birmingham, for asking me, a romance author, to her blog today.  It’s a great pleasure to be here and to know Christy, one of the most supportive women I know, a tremendous poet and an intelligent advocate for us ladies.  My home town, Dundee, gave the U.S. Fanny Wright, lecturer, writer, freethinker, feminist, abolitionist, and social reformer, born here in 1795.

From Dundee to the U.S., Meet Francis Wright

Talking about feminist Francis Wright.

Where the lot of Georgian women was concerned it’s a pity she hadn’t been born a bit earlier and hadn’t been lost to across the pond.

My idea in writing this latest book was to take Brittany, a young woman from today’s world and have her flit between Georgian England and the present day. You know ,I even thought how nice, gracious  and sedate that Jane Austenish world would be, that within hours of arriving, she’d be so calmed by the green-fielded pleasantry and ladies in rustic bonnets everywhere,  she’d fall totally in love with this charming world. DUH.  What is it they say about the best laid plans? The more I looked into this alien galaxy and the lot of women, the clashier, not classier, this became. And not just between my hero and heroine either. What was interesting was the things I had to go to bat for re this book.

The hero is a rake but before anyone thinks too badly of him, a lot of upper crust men from that era were because most society marriages were arranged. Sometimes affection grew but not for my hero, whose shy, awkward, naïve, young wife, he was railroaded into marrying at sixteen,  hated him on sight, so he joined the ranks of men who went elsewhere. At least he didn’t force the issue which he would have been perfectly within his rights to do.

If, as a woman, you think you would have been free to say no, or choose your spouse, think again. You and your belongings, all these nice shoes, bags, books, everything in fact you thought were yours, were, in fact,  your hubby’s. Take the case of rich heiress, Lady Mary Bowes, an ancestor of Queen Elizabeth 2nd, and the subject of The Luck of Barry Lyndon, by Thackeray. Her second husband kidnapped her, beat, gagged and carried her around the countryside  on horseback, in winter, all to stop her divorcing him and keep his hands on her fortune.

The Luck of Barry Lyndon Novel

History, Barry Lyndon, and Shehanne Moore. A mix of past and present.

And to think my editor initially complained after my hero, at the end of his tether and really not understanding  why my heroine wouldn’t do what he asked, stuck her under a water pump.

Mary Bowes escaped only with the help of loyal servants.  The initially sympathetic public were affronted to learn of her affair with her lawyer’s brother and felt she was quite wrong not to hand her money over to her abusive, swindling, husband.

Interestingly, that was another editorial clash where no questions were raised over my hero but some shock was expressed that my heroine had  a history of getting drunk in the present day and went with random men.

So, that’s marriage. Next up? Childbirth. In Georgian England, public opinion was against contraception within marriage.  Romance writers Google all sorts –ahem—let’s face it, these things have to be looked after.

And, I understand sheep’s intestines were all the rage for prevention. Soaked in water, of course, for an hour beforehand and torture to get on. Small wonder my hero quite welcomed the contents of my heroine’s bag. Childbirth was one of the most dangerous threats to a woman’s health and life. Up to 20% of women died during or after childbirth. Small wonder too my heroine wants back to her time.

Childbirth wasn’t the only killer. Noblewomen—and we are talking noblewomen here, although the lot of a poor woman was as bad in different ways— noblewomen caught diseases passed on from their husband’s prostitutes. They suffered barbaric ‘bleedings’ during pregnancies, developed lead poisoning from their make up, indeed as my heroine  Brittany thinks–

Author Quote from The Writer and the Rake

The Lot of Georgian Women. Quote by Shehanne Moore.

And before anyone thinks their lives were frivolous in their smelly gowns—wash day once a month, baths very seldom—their powdered wigs it took hours to arrange, the lady of the house was tasked with running that same house, of getting up early to instruct the servants on their daily duties and supervise the kitchen, because the servants were mostly illiterate and couldn’t write things down, meal choices, polishing,  etc. before sitting down to breakfast at eleven. My heroine thinks the eleven bit is quite civilized but that’s it.

So I think we get the picture that a Georgian lady’s lot was anything but happy.  Live in that time? Thank you. No. As for whether Brittany finds anything to recommend it, you’d have to ask her.

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Extract from The Writer and The Rake

While it might not pay to underestimate this man, what if this morning was an aberration? Now that he saw how domestic she was, he’d go away again and drop this nonsense about instructing the servants. In what way? If she wrote Regency romance, she might know but she didn’t and frankly she’d other things to consider. Besides she couldn’t. If she was successful he wouldn’t need her.

She slipped her gaze back, bestowed her kindest smile on the young man opposite. Mitchell Killgower took another sip of brandy.

“God-fearing, you say?”

“It is what one of us, I can’t remember if it was you, or me, or even Fleming here, told Christian. Or maybe, she told us. But, obviously it is a condition that prevents me from giving too many orders. And frankly I feel it solves everything.”

“Do you?”

“Do I what? Darling, I’m sorry I don’t know what you’re on about.”

“The fact that this condition solves everything.”

She kept her gaze firmly on the wool. Her hands winding it too. Mitchell Killgower sounded quite happy for him. Satisfied as he nursed his drink.

“Yes.”

“So as conditions go, it does not prevent you from sitting on your backside?”

“You know, I almost think you’re taken with my backside, the amount of times you mention it.”

“Sometimes your thoughts fail to come remotely close to what I’m really thinking. To do that you’d have to fully think.”

She smothered a grimace. “Oh, I think all right.”

He set the glass down as if he’d made up his mind. She hoped it was to let her win this battle.

“Good, then you’ll have no trouble coming with me, seeing as you’re so God-fearing, Brittany. After all, a God-fearing wife obeys her husband.”

“Well, they must be several sandwiches short of the proverbial picnic. Anyway.” She stopped winding the ball of wool, tilted her chin. “I didn’t think God-fearing wives were your cup of tea, or that you expected a woman to obey you? Except in certain places.”

The Writer and the Rake Book Blurb

Book Cover from Author Shehanne Moore

Cover of Shehanne Moore’s The Writer and the Rake.

Is having it all enough when it’s all you’ll ever have?

When it comes to doing it all, hard coated ‘wild child’ writer, Brittany Carter ticks every box. Having it all is a different thing though, what with her need to thwart an ex fiancé, and herself transported from the present to Georgian times. But then, so long as she can find her way back to her world of fame, and promised fortune, what’s there to worry about?

He saw her coming. If he’d known her effect he’d have walked away.

Georgian bad boy Mitchell Killgower is at the center of an inheritance dispute and he needs Brittany as his obedient, country mouse wife. Or rather he needs her like a hole in the head. In and out of his bed he’s never known a woman like her. A woman who can disappear and reappear like her either.

And when his coolly contained anarchist, who is anything but, learns how to return to her world and stay there, will having it all be enough, or does she underestimate him…and herself?

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Thanks for being here today, Shehanne! I have my copy of The Writer and the Rake and hope you pick up a copy too. Get The Writer and the Rake at Amazon US | Amazon Canada | Amazon UK

You can also find Shehanne Moore on social media at Facebook, Pinterest, and Twitter.

Find out more at her self-titled Weebly site and follow her Smexy Historical Romance blog too!

Now back to reading and writing here,

♥ Christy

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162 thoughts on “Have You Heard of the Hellfire Club? The Lot of Women in Georgian England (Guest Post)

      1. Heartafire

        It is my pleasure to visit Christy and to find such a beautiful post by you! Thank you for sharing your lovely thoughts and writing with us! 🌺 x

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  1. Graham in Hats

    Near where I lived as a very young man (Benfleet, Essex, UK) is the 15/16th century pub, The Hoy and Helmet. In the open fireplace were small plaques with he names of Hellfire Club members. However, I’m sure one of them was a vicar, so it might have been a different kind of Hellfire Club. 🙂

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    1. shehannemoore

      No. No. That might be right….. Yep. . There were two notable English Hellfire clubs. There was also one in Ireland which I feel was quite the one to live up to its name. I did tons of research on the later English club to use in the book and instead the club became a background only. But despite ‘raking’ about extensively, I couldn’t find anything seriously bad on the second Hellfire club. yeah it pagan etc etc, but it just seemed it was more full of bored, consenting, liked a drink, male and female aristocrats than anything and yes they did sometimes meet in taverns just to drink. A lot of areas set up their own clubs so your plaque will be right and the vicar may not have been that at all.

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        1. Graham in Hats

          Benfleet was originally Beamfleote (Saxon for tree stream) and was the place where the Saxons fought of Viking invaders in 894.

          And, South Benfleet did have a reputation for smuggling. There are even tunnels between the old Hoy and Helmet (wide barge and the shape they leave in the mud) and the nearby church.

          If curiosity were acorns. 🙂

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      1. Graham in Hats

        Out of curiosity I did a little checking. It seems that one or two adopted titles to suit themselves. So my Reverend may not have been squeaky clean after all..

        Aah the mysteries of time and druid spin doctors. Surely people wouldn’t behave like that these days.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Hiiiii, dancing lessons are, well, on hold, as I concentrate instead on fitness classes and writing the next book in my “free” time 😉 Thanks for appreciating Shey’s guest post here xx

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  2. theburningheart

    Well, there may be some sort of synchronicity, or at least ubiquity, going on here, I just left Shehanne’s blog, and I find her here again on your blog Christy.
    And fresh from the press!
    Congratulations to both of you, and Shehanne’s The Writer and The Rake. 🙂

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    1. shehannemoore

      Hee hee. I cut meself in half to be here. I am also on someone else’s blog today but something is wrong with the comments section there so I can be here now instead. Nothing like getting around. And yeah, fresh from the press. Great to see you and thank you for your kind words x

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  3. Christy B Post author

    Reblogged this on When Women Inspire and commented:

    I’m proud to have Shehanne Moore over to the blog Poetic Parfait today. Come join in on the talk about Georgian Women in England and her new book The Writer and the Rake.

    See you there, and happy Friday!

    ♥ Christy

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  4. robbiesinspiration

    A super duper post. Thank you both for sharing. I did know quite a lot of this information about women living in the Georgian era but it is so interesting I was really pleased to read it again. Shey’s book sounds great and I am going to read it.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      It is my pleasure to have you here, and thank you again for the wonderful post! I love the comments that I’m reading now, between you and the readers ~ Fantastic! Cheers to The Writer and the Rake, which is a booming success ♥ xx

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      1. John Fioravanti

        I agree, Shehanne – like another universe. I’ve often wondered about time travel – if it was possible, would I go? Where? When? Although I don’t know everything there is to know about History, what I do know is a deterrent from visiting the past. I’d like to venture into the future – I guess perhaps, that’s why I enjoy writing about human drama in a sci-fi universe. Great meeting you!

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        1. shehannemoore

          Great meeting you too John. Time Travel? I did a guest post about time travel today elsewhere, having embraced the sci-fi side with this book series, about the fact that time travel has never been proved has never stopped writers (including me) writing about the three kinds. I think the fascination could be for various, any places, till we are there, then I am not so sure I’d want to be–as you say. The future now? That could be interesting.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      John, when Shehanne unveiled this post guest post to me, I was so excited to share it! She put a lot of work into it and it’s so nice you noticed that. Cheers to her book!

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    1. shehannemoore

      OMG, Felicia…(And may I say there is a character in the book called that. Far on but yes there is. I almost feel I am speaking to her! I can hardly believe it) Thank you, thank you so much. I am afraid I am a bit snarky when it comes to my ladies. Lovely to meet you xxx

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  5. Aquileana

    Fascinating guest post, dear Christy ….It ´s great to read this post by Shehanne
    I am blown away to learn facts about Lady Mary Bowes. It seems she not only had married twice but that she had many lovers.
    The abortive method you mentioned allowed her to carry on with several abortions (at least three), as It seems she had the tendency to become pregnant repeatedly.
    Her second husband sounded like an abusive, cruel man, by the way!…
    I remember a teacher I once had at the University (when I was doing the preparatory curse. I was a teenager, sigh!). He always mentioned Barry Lindon, in a quite obviously “outside-the class context”. Maybe it was because his mother was irish, hence he liked the story. I couldn´t say: But what I can tell you is now I want to watch that movie!. I might give it a try this sunday, if I find it on Netflix. Thank you!. Love & best wishes! 😀

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    1. shehannemoore

      Ah Angel, many years ago I interviewed the author of a book on Lady Mary for a magazine. (Her name was Wendy Moore.) Anyway Lady Mary was artistic and intelligent and really made a mess with that second hubby. Her fist husband was from the Strathmore Lyons of Glamis Castle which her money helped restore. Glamis is not too far from where I live. x

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    2. Christy B Post author

      Ohhhh Aqui, it sounds like this Sunday will be when you get to the Netflix.. let us know what you learn 😉 Thanks for takign time here and weighing in on what Shehanne wrote so well for us here!

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  6. Ka Malana - Fiestaestrellas.com

    Wow. I was looking at “Loving Lady Lazuli” & now this! ❤ Superb interview! There's something about that era that compels itself into the present, again and again. These historic women certainly have my respect. I appreciate, too, all the research that brings a story alive. Nice to see Sheyanne Moore on both Poetic Parfait and When Women Inspire!

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    1. shehannemoore

      Ka, my lovely Ka, thank you. I am thrilled to be here with Christy. I actually love the research cos I like to rake the bones-no pun intended about rakes- of a time and place and people, just to get the feel. It is so nice to se YOU here xxxx

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  7. Resa

    Shehanne, I adore your blog and the hamsters. Well, I think they are hamsters, but I am pretty bad at zoology. Smexy romance sounds great, too. In fact, I’m involved in one… not …not no I did not say that on live internet!
    Goodness, I love history.
    Best to you, and the new book! _Resa

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    1. shehannemoore

      Hee hee resa, the confessions we make here. Go for it girl. A girl who designs gowns like you should be . Did I just say that on the internet??? Or just keep loving history. Yeah they are hamsters. Lovely to see you Resa xxxxxxxxx

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  8. Mabel Kwong

    Thanks for Shehanne’s work, Christy. This was a lovely write up and I enjoyed reading more about the lives of women in the Georgian era. Women look put together on the front, but behind there is so much going on…and that is still so true today as we go from one point of our lives to another.

    I like that exerpt you shared, and that part at the end goes to show just how strong women and anyone really if they dare speak their mind. Mitchell sounds like the guy who thinks he can have it all as and when he commands. But with just a setence from someone, someone can feel blindsided and the power shifts. It sounds like a great book and I will put it on my to-read list 🙂

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    1. shehannemoore

      Mabel, firstly THANK YOU so, so much. I am thrilled by your words, more so that you came by and read my post. Moreso that you commented. I totally agree that women hold so much together on the surface, we show a certain face to the world whatever and however. We hold so much together period. I did create in Mitchell, a man who is used to having his own way. He’s very much a man of that time that way In fact I was saying to Christy in an email that after one run in with my ed who asked me to tone him down, I refused saying that he was actually quite enlightened for a man of that time. (My ed’s jaw hit the deck.) Because in many ways he is. He would like a woman who can be more his equal, having suffered through a very unhappy marriage. But he just can’t quite get his head round this one who appears from nowhere with a 21st century attitude and won’t do a thing he says. There’s a lot of power shifts that way. x

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      1. Mabel Kwong

        Mitchell certainly sounds like someone who will go to great lengths to get what he wants. Good that you wrote so honestly about how it was in the past – and I think that gives Mitchell the character that he’s got 😀 Maybe he’s met his match with this unpredictable woman 😀

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        1. shehannemoore

          Hee hee… yes indeed he has. She is a loose cannon. I quite liked blending a woman from today who doesn’t abide by any conventions with a man from this time. And yep, he has been going to quite some lengths to get what he regards as his, property-wise. x

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  9. catcavendish

    Great post. yes the 18th century may seem, on the surface, to be all Jane Austen and gracious living but, as you rightly say, Shehanne, it had some serious downsides. Not an era I woould be comfortable in.

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    1. shehannemoore

      Me neither Cat. No, no, no. But I seriously did start off taking the angle that Brittany would quite like all this gracious living and it might calm her down, until I did a more scratching beneath the surface and the reality was far removed from Austen. That was when I thought NO.

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      1. shehannemoore

        In fact you might say Brittany went berserk with the idea she would, for two seconds, like Georgian England and then she got in that water pump scrammy with Mitchell. SO that was really the end of my little notion x

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  10. Billybuc

    I’m not a big fan of romance novels, but I am a history buff, so I could appreciate this as a glimpse into an interesting history…and I am a fan of Christy’s, and any friend of hers is a friend of mine. A job well done, both of you!

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    1. shehannemoore

      Billy, I am not really a fan of romance novels either. (Oops did I just say that? Looks over shoulder.) I just like writing a story against a historical backdrop and ground. I have always loved the past and I sat on the scenario that is the present day bit of this book for yoinks because it is a modern scenario and I don’t write modern. Primarily it is people who interest me. What makes them tick, their lack of self awareness, their foibles and flaws, why they are the way they are. I really fell into writing ‘romance’ because it was a way of getting fiction published. Liking to make things difficult for myself, I do it my way, alas. Lovely to meet you oh friend of Christy. She’s a great lady x

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        1. shehannemoore

          Yeah I did. I just love when folks say they don’t read romance cos not only do I not read, I don’t really write it either xxxxxxx (Looks back over shoulder. You never heard that.) x

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  11. D. Wallace Peach

    Fascinating post, Shey. Thanks Christie for hosting. I knew life in the late 18th century was tough on women, but this description makes me thank the stars I wasn’t around then. Ugh. The research is clearly excellent and I enjoyed the extract. Sounds like a winner of a book 😀

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    1. shehannemoore

      I don’t think me and that era would have got along too well. In fact I would have headed for the nearest cave on a far off uninhabited island, all folks who felt the same would have been welcome. Thank you for reading and commenting xxxxxxxxx

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  12. paulandruss

    Absolutely brilliant post Shey.

    I enjoyed all the detail in your thorough investigation of the social mores of the time. You capture the spirit of the age so well and the shocking lot of women in the period.

    As you say in your brilliant interview, we tend to think the past is all Pride and Prejudice like some Sunday afternoon film of fluttering virgins and Mr Darcys, whereas, in truth, the past is not just another country but your worst nightmare!

    One of the many things I’m enjoying about THE WRITER AND THE RAKE (which is brilliantly written – smart witty and quite unputdownable) is the way Brittany’s attitude and sharp wits needle Mitchell in a way he can barely comprehend. The juxtaposition of the two with the socially weaker sex having the whip hand and running rings round an assured gentleman at the top of the social ladder is sheer class.

    Although nowhere near the end, I can easily see Mitchell trying to tame Birittany- failing utterly and then (shock horror) respecting her as an equal and falling for her. Can’t wait to see how it turns out…

    And no don’t dare tell me, I’m enjoying the journey far too much to want to get there too soon!

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  13. Pingback: Have You Heard Of The Hellfire Club? – The Militant Negro™

    1. shehannemoore

      DG!!!! My darling Debby, it is lovely to be asked here. A true treat for me, when Christy is an amazing and inspiring lady in every way and I love her poetry. Thank you, thank you for coming by. it is lovely to see you too, oh hamstah dude favourite xxx

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  14. Sarah Potter Writes

    What a fascinating post about an intriguing but brutal period in time (Shehanne, did you watch the series “Taboo” on TV in the UK recently? The brutality definitely came out in that!). Thanks, Christy, for this guest post and for helping add another book to my reading list 🙂

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    1. shehannemoore

      I did indeed watch Taboo. t was very different to Poldark and I am not only up for a bitta difference, especially in historical drama where I do feel it is most needed, I likes to write that bit of difference when I can! Like you Sarah, what I find interesting about this Georgian period of history is now chocolate boxy it looked on the surface but scratch that, and oh dear, dear, DEAR. Thank YOU, for the lovely comment, taking the time to read AND adding another book to your TBR pile. That is so kind of you, it’s quite made my day xxxx

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      1. Sarah Potter Writes

        I’m so glad to have made your day 🙂 I’ve heard that there’s going to be a second series of Taboo, which is brilliant news. I’m also a fan of Peaky Blinders, another gritty and historically authentic drama, but of course set in another time period. It just doesn’t work for me if history is sanitised. I might have stayed awake in history classes at school, if they hadn’t skirted over and around the gritty, uncomfortable stuff. I look forward to reading your book xxxx

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        1. shehannemoore

          OMG I LOVE Peaky Blinders, totally and utterly. One of my fav series of all time that one and I don’t know many that are so consistent in terms of the writing. Never been disappointed on an episode yet. They are so unafraid to take risks on that series. It’s gritty, it’s nail biting, the characters are awful and yet with that spark of decency, that humanity at times, that makes you root for them. The acting is fabulous. Cinematography is amazing. Things like the wedding was epic, priceless and brave. The fist fight, that Russian guest getting murdered and buried, behind the scenes–right up my street. And I liked the way that first series was also a romance –and I am not remotely into slop, so it sure wasn’t sloppy rom – between Grace and Tommy. I do love history but I want the nitty gritty of it, the way people lived and why. The social history of a time is fascinating. Reading that makes you aware of how much your ancestors were survivors.

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        2. Sarah Potter Writes

          We have to wait until the Autumn for Peaky Blinders Series 4 and, apparently, there’s an intended Series 5 as well. I love the way Tommy stares at people with those bright blue eyes out of his baby face, even when he’s ordering him to do the worst of things. And Arthur, he’s a case. As for Aunt Polly …I just love her. Then there was Tom Hardy, the man himself, playing the part of Alfred “Alfie” Solomons, the Jewish gang leader from Camden. Tom Hardy is such a brilliant character actor. I’m so hoping he will be the next James Bond, as I’m sure he’ll play the part like nobody else has before. I could rabbit on about TV series and films forever, but I’m very choosy about what I watch as there’s a lot of really crud stuff out there. As for our ancestors being survivors, I only have to think about walking about in bare feet all winter and eating dry bread full of weevils, living in a poor house, dying of smallpox and all the other horrors that beset people, to know how lucky I am to be alive now.

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        3. shehannemoore

          Oh Sarah, you take drops from my heart. My great great grandfather was born in a workhouse. He cleaned chimneys at the age of 7. I have an unusually mixed bunch of survivors that way, everything from the Irish famine, starving highlanders, to foreign mercenaries, assassins (alas) and at one point titled robber barons . I see you are the same in some ways. The thing is they did survive and they came from all over to do that.
          Re TV Series You are right re cruddy stuff. And sometimes you get a brilliant two or three season thing that just goes down the tubes. Peaky Blinders has never done that. I meant to add they also have Nick Cave’s music and I loved his music before that. I felt right at home the minute I saw that. Ok…I love Polly. I love the way she goes for broke at times and the way she dealt with the Sam Neill character Life has only ever broken her so far and she has ben through the lot. And I think Helen McCrory is a brilliant actress. Arthur is what we call a heid banger up here. And Tom Hardy is wonderful as Alfie Solomons. He’s the wide boy but not. Tommy and these eyes as he orders the most awful things is something else. you are right. But there’s that vulnerable side there too in some ways and I love that. I try to get at that when I write, cos we all have that. That scene where Tommy went to Alfie about his wee boy, last season cos he’d been kidnapped …… Well class acting and writing. Hee hee, like you I could talk all day about TV Series, cos I am so damned choosy too and my Mr is aye going on at me to stop analysing and putting him off things and shut up and watch it. xxx

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        4. Sarah Potter Writes

          Your ancestors sound most colourful. Mine are a mixed bag. To name a few: Highland Scots on one side and Lowland Scots on the other (warring clans, of course), Norwegian (possibly lumberjacks), French nobility, English landowners, doctors, spiritualists and psychics. Although my Mr is an A-type personality, for some reason I get to choose the TV we watch! Mostly he agrees with my choice. As for the programme planners pulling the plug on series that I’ve been watching — it has happened so many times. To list a few: Jericho, Banished, Flash Forward, Utopia, The Paradise. Then there are those that go on for too many episodes and fizzle out like damp squibs or have crud endings, such as Lost and Babylon 5. There’s nothing that annoys me more than if I’ve invested hours in watching or reading something, and the ending is unsatisfactory. Yes, just like you, I analyse and analyse, but that’s the writer in us. All I’m watching on TV at the moment is Doctor Who, Miss Fisher’s Murder Mysteries, The 100, and The Last Kingdom. I will be watching Game of Thrones when the most recent series is available to buy, as we don’t have Sky TV. I also love Nordic noir and French crime thrillers. …I think our discussion probably has a longer word count than your riveting post by now 🙂 xxxx

          Liked by 1 person

        5. shehannemoore

          Lol, our replies do. I liked Banished. I was sorry they pulled the plug on it. All this viewing figures stuff. And yeah there’s a lot of crud out there. Your ancestors sound quite fascinating as well my dear. A very nicely mixed bag, far more interesting than ones who sat in the same place through the generations. Be proud of me for keeping this reply nice and short !!!! xxxx

          Liked by 1 person

      1. Sarah Potter Writes

        I’ve added your book to my to-read shelf and mentioned it in answer to a Goodreads “ask the author” question about my proposed summer reading list. Just thought you’d like to know that, Shehanne, being on your best behaviour today 😉 xxxxx

        Liked by 1 person

        Reply
        1. shehannemoore

          Hee hee…. BUT have you watched any good tv progs….??? Seriously, Sarah, you rock big time lady. I got your question and answered it too being on my very best behaviour today. Had to go open up my cloud reader to see. Have had two diff sets of edits for two diff books back to back so have not had much time lately to indulge. BUT, after tomorrow I should. NO wait, then I got to step in to the breach here on my Mr’s play. End of June. THAT is when I will get through a whole ton of books. If I am not lying down in a darkened room by then. Sarah, yir a doll xxxxx

          Liked by 1 person

  15. milliethom

    A great guest post – entertaining and amusing and I really enjoyed reading it. Your book sounds great and I’ve added it to my TBR list. I don’t think I’d take a trip back to the Georgian period, even if someone offered to take me! Lol. Thanks for the post, Shehanne and thank you, Christy for hosting.

    Liked by 2 people

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    1. shehannemoore

      Millie, I wouldn’t go back to Georgian times either. Thank you…..no. You and I can go somewhere better I am sure and live it up there. Thank YOU for reading, commenting, thanking me and as if that isn’t enough, adding my book to your TBR pile Thank you so much for that. I was just away to say my day today has been made again BUT I see we are now into a new day where I am and it has been made already by you xxxx

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    1. shehannemoore

      Carol, you are an angel in every way as always. Coming by, reading, saying this. Now I go hide in corner and do cringe to paraphrase the hamsters on their Cossack dance routine. I loved doing this post for Christy and I am gobsmacked by the response there’s been too. Thank you xxxxxxxxxxxxx

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
  16. Annika Perry

    Christy, this is a wonderful guest post! 😀 Shehanne, wow! 😃I didn’t have to read far until I felt I’d become immersed in the Georgian world…how I feel for those women; the conditions alone are bad enough before even attempting to think or act for oneself. I love the idea of a present-day Brittany travelling back to that era – a fantastic premise for a book. I didn’t get far into your post before I was off looking into Fanny Wright – what a fascinating woman, how strong-willed and forward thinking. I’d never heard of her before (to my shame!) despite often visiting Dundee. Best of luck with your book, Shehanne and one I’ve made a note to read!

    Liked by 1 person

    Reply
    1. shehannemoore

      ANNIKA!! you come to Dundee? Well next time you let me know and we will meet. You know something? hHlf of Dundee has never heard of Frances Wright. A few years back this American woman came here and she berated us good Dundee fowks for not acknowledging this lady. But that is just Dundee fowks for you. We don’t acknowledge anyone. It took forever to even get that plaque put up where she was born. Apparently in the US she is well heard of. I think the conditions were pretty bad in this era. Yeah. I would NOT have wanted to live then. The thing is for the sort of women a step removed from the upper echelons, the hope was that they would marry well, or face being a kind of poor governess, or teacher. A kind of devil or deep blue sea scenario. Re the biz of the present day heroine going back This book is part of a series I never meant to write. I was just talking myself out of a time travelling hole with my editor on the last book. Anyway, when I thought where to go next with this series, I wanted to go back to the start. That is the present day. But the problem was when I worked out the family tree by going backwards from the first book, 1765 was where I landed. Not a lot was going on really historically for a backdrop. That was where I got the idea of dropping a high octane present day woman into this setting. Of course I imagined it would be tranquil but the more I looked at? Nah, But hey, I had fun. Lovely to see you Annika x

      Liked by 1 person

      Reply
      1. Annika Perry

        Oh, I would never imagine that would be tranquil scenario, Shey! 😀 I just love the premise and during a right-brain writing course many years ago I wrote a short story of a modern woman buying an old remote house on the moors and slipping through time on/off to the early 1800s…it spooked me just putting the words on paper!

        Perhaps, I should have said, I used to go to Dunee a lot – when I was at university in St. Andrews. I am intending to visit agin either later this year or next year – show my family the wonderful area. I’ll definitely let you know when I’m up there! It would be great to meet up.😃❤️

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  17. noelleg44

    Just finished reading a book set in Georgian London – complete with the description of a woman’s death from venereal disease provided by her husband. I have no desire to make a trip to that time! I would have made a real bitch of a wife and a member of the Hellfire Club for sure.

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  18. Tina Frisco

    Fantastic post, Christy and Shey! I had a flashback ~ not a déjà vu, but a literal flashback ~ while reading this. All 3 of us were members of a group equivalent to the Hellfire Club. And we were unflappable shakers and movers of the time. The problem with flashbacks is that you can’t always hold on to the images. But the feeling remains. I knew you two gals were close to my heart, but this confirms it. We have traveled together through many lifetimes. So glad we finally reconnected in this one 🙂 Hugs, my friends ♥♥

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  19. cav12

    Great article, Shey and a part of history I am not conversant with. History does repeat, arranged marriages has been around for thousands of years, and women throughout time seemed to be at the mercy of men. Somethings just don’t change.
    Thank you for sharing this precious detail and history.

    Liked by 2 people

    Reply
  20. shehannemoore

    Aw, thank you, my darling for reading and lovely to se you here . You are right re arranged marriages. Nowt new there. Of course the Lady Mary Bowes chose her second hubby herself… what failed her there was the law. Anyway, glad you enjoyed xx

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  21. Pingback: Have you ever heard of the Hellfire Club? The Lot of Women in Georgian England-reblog | shehanne moore

  22. reocochran

    This is an amazing way to incorporate the best of our current world (more confident women, contraceptives, sexual prowess. . .) with the unique characteristics and setbacks found in the ancient
    I have two other books writtenby my dear Shehanne, which I just started a rough draft titled summer reading. . .

    Liked by 3 people

    Reply
    1. reocochran

      Oops, cellphone thought I was finished!
      Loose ends left!
      ~ ancient days where women were considered “chattel.”
      ~ I think there are five other books on my short reading list. (Budget necessitated this.)
      I forgot to thank Christy for hosting Shehanne and helping set this up so professionally! She is a sweetheart and wonderful writer in her own rights. 💐 🌈 💮
      I forgot to say, Good luck, Shehanne on your newest exciting launch! 🎁 🎆 🍾 👠👠
      hugs xo

      Liked by 3 people

      Reply
        1. reocochran

          So happy to have visited today. Sometimes I wait till weekend and feel I am “a step behind!” You’re always welcome, since it is a pleasure to visit, Christy. 🙂

          Liked by 1 person

    2. shehannemoore

      Aw, you are so sweet and kind in every way. I think being free to make certain choices has certainly empowered women. I am thrilled you liked this post my darling AND I can’t thank you enough for having my books xxxxxx

      Liked by 1 person

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  23. Maniparna Sengupta Majumder

    The book sounds like a perfect concoction of history and fiction. Undoubtedly, a lot of research and hard work were needed to come up with a book of such stature. Congratulations to Shehanne, wish her all the best with the book. It’s a pity that Amazon UK/US doesn’t deliver to India!

    And, thanks loads to Christy for hosting such a wonderful post… 🙂

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