Analysis of the Poem ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’ by Robert Frost

A famous poem from Robert Frost

The eight lines of “Nothing Gold Can Stay,” written by Robert Frost.

In a recent author interview, I explained that one of my favorite poems is “Nothing Gold Can Stay” by Robert Frost. Shortly after the interview published, my friend and fellow blogger Aquileana of La Audacia de Aquiles commented to me that she had not heard of this particular poem.

Upon reading it, she was as fascinated with it as I have been since high school. I first came across the poem while reading the book The Outsiders by S.E. Hinton (more on that later). As Aquileana and I chatted about the poem, it became clear that there was a lot to discuss, from the imagery within the brilliant lines to Robert Frost’s use of rhyme and meter. Below is our collaborative analysis of “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”

About the Publication of ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’

Robert Frost’s eight-line poem first appeared in his book New Hampshire in 1923. The book later won a Pulitzer Prize in 1924.

Poet and playwright Frost

A young Robert Frost.

Perhaps even more amazing is that the American poet went on to win three more Pulitzer Prizes during his lifetime, in 1931, 1937, and 1943! He lived from 1874-1963.

At the time that “Nothing Gold Can Stay” first published, Frost was 48 years old. Other short poems in the volume New Hampshire included “Dust of Snow” and “Fire and Ice.”

Other poets that are masterful at the short poem format, which requires the writer to be concise and evoke imagery in few words, include Walt Whitman and Emily Dickinson.

“Nothing Gold Can Stay” has only 40 words and uses simple words, but many messages exist within it.

Summary and Imagery in ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’

The First Half

While there are no words beyond two syllables in this poem, and the majority of them are monosyllabic, when taken together the lines have the ability to bring about strong emotions in readers. At first glance, the poem is simple, yet it steeps deep with imagery. It is tempting to characterize Robert Frost’s creation as a nature poem, and you would not be wrong in doing so, but it is so much more.

The beginning image is the start of spring when nature is first blossoming from the earth. The first four lines describe the flourishing of a leaf. As Frost writes, “Her early leaf’s a flower,” with “Her” meaning Mother Nature. He explains that the leaf turns from green to gold as it blooms.

However, this blossoming is short in length, as explained by the fourth line, “But only so an hour.” This line is where the beautiful scene of flourishing nature takes a turn. Notice that it does so exactly halfway through the poem.

The Second Half

The last four lines of “Nothing Gold Can Stay” explain what happens after nature’s departure from gold. Once the flowering ends, after only an hour, “Then leaf subsides to leaf.”

From Green to Gold

The leaves turn from green to gold in Victoria, BC, and elsewhere. ©2016 Christy Birmingham

Of course, the poet chose the words in this line well as he suggests with the repetition of the word “leaf” that the leaf was not meant to stay as a gold-colored flower but instead to return to its leaf form. The leaf outlives the flower. From the perspective of nature alone, this reasoning certainly makes sense as seasons turn and the blossoming comes and goes, with leaves lasting longer than the flowers.

But, there is a deeper meaning in this poem than how nature behaves in the world. The truth of this statement becomes clear at line six when the image of Eden is presented to the surprise of the reader.

Here we see that the clever Robert Frost is depicting three kinds of cycles in his poem. Firstly is the cycle of nature throughout the year, as shown by the seasons. The second type of cycle is in mythical form, with the image of Eden, which is symbolic of humankind. In both cycles, there is a moment of achieving perfection, followed by a descent into a less-impressive quantity.

Indeed, the change from green to gold is about more than color alone. It also represents a shift in mood, with the word “grief” in line six depicting the transition as being unfavorable and causing misery.

At the line “So dawn goes down to day,” we as the readers are taken back to nature and the daily cycle. Aha, here is a third cycle! It is the daily fluctuation of nature, from daytime to nighttime, and back again. And then, how amazing that the final line is “Nothing gold can stay,” which is the same as the title. This final line creates a cycle of the poem too, thanks to the use of repetition. Very clever, Mr. Frost.

What Does Gold Represent in ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’?

The poem’s reference to gold is not like the element in the Periodic Table but instead gold refers to the finest things in life, like a sunset or the laughter of a baby. Gold is a symbol of all that is beautiful and of the highest worth.

Dawn Goes Down

Dawn is golden.

Golden are dawn, the spring season, and the Garden of Eden. But the beauty is only temporary, with night following morning, fall and winter following summer and the plummet of Eve. As for the once-golden flower, it returns to a green leaf and eventually dies.

Two Paradoxes

Interestingly, “Nothing Gold Can Stay” includes two paradoxes at the start. The parallel paradoxes are “green is gold” and “leaf’s a flower.” They are paradoxical because they seem to make sense but do not.

With “green is gold,” it is not possible to be both the color green and gold at the same time, right? And how can a leaf be a flower too? But, indeed, it is possible if you look at these descriptions as being part of a cycle, where green turns to gold and leaf turns to flower. But, the bloom is fast, as per the line “But only so an hour.”

Why Does Poet Frost Mention Eden in His Poem?

Eve and the Apple

The poisoned apple in the Garden of Eden

The line “So Eden sank to grief” refers to the fall of Adam and Eve from the Garden of Eden in the Bible. Eve disobeyed the order not to eat the fruit and when she did it resulted in her banishment from the Garden forever. This activity is said to be responsible for the grief that humankind has felt since that moment.

While Eden began as a golden paradise, it soon became a source of pain and grief. It is an example of the fleeting nature of gold, meaning the good things in life do not stay amazing but instead turn within a short time to something less pleasing.

Also, Eden is mentioned as a symbol of mortality. Humans start out youthful, grow to become adults, live to be elderly, and then die.

The golden time is transitory, which makes it even more important to us. We must not miss the moment that the gold is shining! Adam and Even enjoyed their youth and then came the fall from Eden, marking the end of this phase for them.

Identifying the Speaker in ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’

The speaker of the poem is neither male nor female. Often analyses of the poem use “he” because the poet is a man. However, you will find no personal notations in the poem.

The objective voice makes sense as the poem is more about observation than about any personal happenings or views of the speaker. Or, perhaps we can look at the readers as being the real speaker here.

Applying the Golden Message to Today

While “Nothing Gold Can Stay” first published in 1923, its symbolism is still relevant today. The golden message in the poem is that even the most beautiful thing on Earth cannot stay gold forever.

While on one hand, this point is a sad one as we won’t have gorgeous things around us forever, there is another way to look at it. The alternative viewpoint is that the fleeting nature of beauty and life provides us with a reminder to cherish things while they are still alive, whether it be nature, people, animals, or something else. Everything fades and we would be wise to appreciate them while they are still here.

For example, consider the line “So Eden sank to grief.” While Eve ate the fruit, which punished all the generations to come, it is not entirely a tragedy in that the start of history was set, and people born after that would understand guilt and sin – including us! There is a positive point to the sorrow.

Look at What We Can Learn From the Poem

Be Positive.

While that which is “gold” (in the poem, the images are early spring leaves, flowers, Garden of Eden, and dawn) does not stay in this perfect form forever, there is an upside. Once we know that all will fade one day, then we can take efforts to appreciate it more in the current moment. In other words, carpe diem, a Latin phrase meaning “seize the day.”

Also, the world will still go on to regrow leaves, continue the seasons, etc. Plus, if things didn’t fade then they wouldn’t be so amazing, would they?

My Personal Connection to This Poem

On a personal note, this poem has been one I have cherished since high school, as I mentioned earlier. I adored the poem not only for its simplicity and beautiful imagery but also for the context in which I learned about it.

The poem was featured in the 1967 book The Outsiders, which is still one of my all-time favorite reads. The book was part of our English class reading list. I remember having countless conversations with my friend Deb about author S.E. Hinton’s characters, including Ponyboy Michael Curtis, Johnny Cade, Dallas Winston, and Sodapop Curtis.

Here is the scene in The Outsiders when Ponyboy recites the poem “Nothing Gold Can Stay”:

Did you know that S.E. Hinton wrote The Outsiders when she was only 16 years old? The movie adaptation of the book, which had the same name, was released in 1983 and featured many young actors we would later know very well, including Tom Cruise, Rob Lowe, Ralph Macchio, and C. Thomas Howell.

‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’ in The Outsiders: What Does the Poem Mean?

In the context of The Outsiders, Frost’s poem is like a shadow of the book’s plot. Two of the main characters (Johnny and Ponyboy) start young and innocent at the book’s beginning but lose their purity by the final pages. The inclusion of the poem in the novel foreshadows the ending to come, although I won’t spoil who or what takes the turn for the worst at the end, in case you are not familiar with The Outsiders. The “first green” of the poem is like the innocence of Ponyboy and Johnny.

Another Movie Reference to the Poem

Many years after I welcomed The Outsiders and “Nothing Gold Can Stay” into my life, I watched the movie The Fault in Our Stars. You can imagine my surprise when the character Hazel recited Robert Frost’s poem in one scene of the movie.

While the poem’s inclusion in the movie, which is based on the John Green book, is minor, there was no way I would miss it. In the book, the poem’s mention comes in a scene when Hazel starts to lose hope for the future:

“It seemed to me that I had already seen everything pure and good in the world, and I was beginning to suspect that even if death didn’t get in the way, the kind of love that Augustus and I share could never last. “So dawn goes down to day,” the poet wrote, “Nothing gold can stay.”

~ Excerpt from The Fault in Our Stars by John Green (page 278).

Now, let’s move from an analysis of the poem to its style and form.

The Poetic Style & Form of ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’

Note how precise the phrasing is in the Robert Frost poem. There are no unnecessary words, which is quite the feat given the rhyming lines! For the rhyme scheme, it is AABBCCDD.

Each pair of lines rhymes with one another (A with A, B with B, and so forth). AA is “gold” and “hold,” BB is “flower” and “hour,” CC is “leaf” and “grief,” and DD is “day” and “stay.” There are eight verses in total.

Rhyming Couplets

The stanzas of two rhyming lines are called Rhyming Couplets. Examples are “leaf” / “grief,” and “gold” / “hold.” If you read aloud the poem it is a fun one, given these rhymes at the end of the lines. To be a proper Rhyming Couplet, the lines must be about the same length and relate to the same image.

Analyzing these couplets in more detail, it becomes apparent that the poem takes the form of iambic trimeter. Thank you Aquileana for helping me fully understand iamb! Iambic trimeter means:

Iamb = a metrical foot that contains one unstressed syllable before a stressed syllable, such as “then leaf” or “her hard”); Iamb is clear in lines 2 – 7

Trimeter = three iambs per line

The iambic trimeter applies to lines 2-6. While not every line is iambic, there are three stressed syllables per line. Perhaps Frost used this poetic style as a way to make it have a repetitive quality to it when read, which shadows the cyclical theme within the poem’s message.

The poetic meter of "Nothing Gold Can Stay"

Foot / meter details from “Nothing Gold Can Stay”

Alliteration in the Poem

Throughout “Nothing Gold Can Stay,” you will find examples of alliteration. This term refers to the same sound or letter at the beginning of words that are close to or beside one another. The alliteration in the poem is as follows:

Line one – green and gold
Line two – hardest, hue, and hold
Line five – leaf and leaf
Line six – so and sank
Line seven – dawn, down, and day

The repetition of sounds is useful for attracting readers’ attention to certain parts of the poem. In line one, for example, gold is the second “g” and considered to be of higher importance than green.

Here is a good video about the rhyme scheme and alliteration in “Nothing Gold Can Stay”:

More about Poetic Meter: A Trochee

Both the first and last lines contain a trochee. This particular metrical foot has a stressed syllable with an unstressed or weak one behind it. A trochee is an iamb in reverse! Two examples are “Nature” and “Nothing.”

Looking further at lines one and eight, the syllables in both lines have the same sound: “N.” The similarities between these lines correspond to the cyclical theme of the poem. Generally, a trochee is useful when a writer wants a reader to pay particular notice to a word or, in Frost’s case, to a certain “N” sound.

Look further at lines one and eight to see that both lines start with “N” and together sandwich the other lines that follow the iambic trimeter. Also, the only mentions of gold are in the first and last lines.

Change in Metaphor in ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’

But, although only lines one and eight of the poem contain the word “gold,” the meaning of this word is quite different from the start to the end. At the start, gold represents hope, while at the end, after imagery of loss, the association with gold is more one of gratitude than anything else.

The ending encourages the reader to make the most of the golden moments as they are short in duration. There is both an appreciation for the world and understanding of its ever-changing existence, which is inevitable.

Gold is Beautiful

Time with family are the golden moments for me. ©2015 Christy Birmingham

A Spondee & A Missing Foot

Line one also contains a spondee. The metrical foot contains two stressed syllables, in a successive manner. So, the spondee is “first green,” as both syllables are accented. The intention of the spondee is to illustrate the most important concept in the poem. As the two syllables are stressed, they force the reader to slow down while saying them, which makes the reader hold onto the image, which does not last (neither does gold).

Then, when you come to the last line, you will notice that the line is cut short. In other words, it has a missing foot. Being one unstressed syllable short may be Frost’s way of trying to make the writer get two syllables out of gold rather than the usual one (by making the “o” sound go long when being read).

As gold has such an important meaning in the poem, this argument is very plausible. Gold can symbolize many things in this poem, such as perfection or love.

As a bit of an aside, gold has many mentions in the Bible. A person can be golden, as in Job 23:10, which says “But He knows the way that I take; when He has tried me, I shall come forth as gold.” In other words, after being tried by God, he will come out pure as gold from the intense tests.

In the Bible, gold is often used to symbolize that which endures fire. Gold is also a representation of wealth and power. While the Bible does not come outright and say the gold is evil, it does issue a few warnings, including not to abuse it.

The Denouement of Frost’s Poem

In the denouement or final portion of the poem, the loss is the focal point. There is more and more loss, from Eden to dawn and the end of the gold state. It is in the final line of “Nothing Gold Can Stay” that the main realization comes to the reader: nothing, not one thing, stays gold forever. And so you must cherish the good and prompt the world to keep moving forward.

How is ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’ Similar to ‘Out, Out-‘?

Two of Robert Frost’s poems may be more alike than first thought. Aquileana mused this was the case, and I agreed. If you were already kind enough to follow Poetic Parfait in early 2015, you might have read my interpretation of “Out, Out-” with Aquileana.

In both poems, Frost draws attention to the speed with which life can end. In “Out, Out-” it is the boy’s life that is taken, while the life in “Nothing Gold Can Stay” is humankind or nature, depending how you read the poem.

The changing nature of life and the world around us takes center stage in both of the poet’s works. The gloominess of the ending of life is addressed in both poems, with an ending message that looks to a bigger picture and life lesson for the reader.

You might also see a resemblance to William Shakespeare’s Seven Ages of Man. In the monologue from As You Like It, “all the world’s a stage” with men and women having entrances and exits.

Concluding Thoughts on ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’

Simple and Complex, As Told in Poetry

Daisies: More Complex Than They May At First Seem

The eight-line poem is deceivingly simple in language, with a complex message underlying its words. It appears as simple as a daisy, pictured to the left, but is the flower really so simple?

The couplings of the poem illustrate changes and the ultimate fading of golden things, which is an inevitable phenomenon.

All that is golden must ultimately end, whether it be dawn, Eden, or the poem itself. The short format of the poem, in which each word lends a purpose, is symbolic of the short life of that which is golden. Through literary devices, such as alliteration and trochees, poet Frost makes clear his message in “Nothing Gold Can Stay.”

Questions for You

Is this poem new to you? Do you agree with the poetry analysis or have anything additional to add to it? Also, which Robert Frost poem is your favorite? I would love to hear from you in the comments below!

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128 thoughts on “Analysis of the Poem ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’ by Robert Frost

    1. Wifey Monologue

      Wow, that’s nicely and wonderfully put. Presented in such a person who first encounter the poem will truly understand what it means. There are so many things in the poem that are meaningful and beautiful to the experience. Thanks for putting it out on your post. I loved Robert Frost poem the “The Road Not Taken”. 🤗

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      1. Christy B Post author

        Thank you Wifey Monologue and how wonderful to see you too! I am pleased you enjoyed our analysis and saw the beauty in the poem. Yes, “The Road Not Taken” has great symbolism!

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  1. Billybuc

    It is not new to me but I haven’t read it in a very long time, and certainly not with the depth you’ve displayed here. As I approach my sixty-eighth birthday I reflect often on matters such as this….the fleeing nature of life….the joys and ultimate losses….the hours wasted…..it all falls under a category I call “sweet melancholy.”

    hugs from Olympia

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  2. Aquileana

    Nothing gold can stay… But as Shakespeare says in Sonnet 18:
    `When in eternal lines to time thou grow’s- So long as men can breathe or eyes can see,
    So long lives this, and this gives life to thee´. As long as men are alive and have eyes with which to see, this analysis will live. In other words, power of literature lies in its transcendence, beyond any contingency 😉
    The post is excellent dear Christy, very well articulated, presented and explained … it was wonderful to discuss and exchanges views on it with you… Thanks so much, dear friend. Sending love and best wishes, always. Aquileana 😉

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Ohhhh how lovely of you to add the quote from Shakespeare Sonnet 18, Aqui ♥ Literature is timeless and ever golden, along with the link between BGPs xxoo Thank you again for being such an important part of this post! I’m glad you liked how it turned out. HUGS

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  3. syl65

    This poem is new to me, Christy. Thank you for this wonderful analysis, interpretation and breakdown. I did see The Outsiders and watching this scene gives these two characters a deeper meaning.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      How wonderful to introduce you, one of my favourite poets, to one of my favourite poems.. This is a great (“golden”) moment 🙂 Aquileana was a big help here with the post – she is awesome too!

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  4. Chitrangada Sharan

    What an excellent and insightful analysis of the poem! Sometimes the most simple things in life convey the most complicated facts of life. Robert Frost has always been my favourite.
    Loved your interpretation! Thanks!

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    1. Christy B Post author

      YES, simple can be the utmost in complexity!! How insightful of you to notice this aspect of the poem, Chitrangada. Thank you – and cheers to you and Mr. Robert Frost 🙂

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  5. Bun Karyudo

    This is a wonderful and very full analysis. I hadn’t read this particular Robert Frost poem before your post, so funnily enough my first thought on seeing the title was to think of leaves turning a beautiful golden color but then falling from a tree. I guess I was influenced by the fact that it’s now September and so the summer is dying. 🙂

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Oh how great that the title alone had you thinking of the image of green to golden, which is actually in the poem.. You are a wise one, Bun – perhaps because of all of the pong playing? 😉

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  6. Susan Sproull

    I have not read this poem. Christy, I love your interpretation but the analysis takes away from the simple beauty of the poem.

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  7. Rajagopal

    Brilliant analysis of a profoundly meaningful poem of Robert Frost, which I have not read. So this is also to thank you Christy for bringing it to me adorned with your clinical explanations and video clippings. Have I read Robert Frost? The answer is yes. Two of his poems, ‘The Road Less Travelled’ and ‘Standing by Woods on a Snowy Evening’. The lines, ‘The woods are lovely, dark and deep / But I have promises to keep / And miles to go before I sleep….’ keep ringing as a daily wake-up call to the many unattended tasks demanding one’s attention. These lines were also a favorite of India’s first prime minister Nehru. He had these words in his diary at the time of his death.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Oh Raj, how profound your comment is and I like how you always teach me something new.. I had not known about Nehru’s words of Frost’s poem in his diary.. Indeed, Robert Frost touches many lives, even after his golden time has ended.. Thank you for enjoying the analysis. It truly was a collaborative effort between Aquileana and I that was driven by our love for the poem. So glad you appreciate it!

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  8. Dee

    My teacher’s view is applauding this excellent post on Frost’s poem. This would engage students to pursue the meaning of life with interest. What caught me was your reference to a baby’s laugh being gold. How quickly that gold diminishes with time — too soon it is all gone. Cherish the moments of gold!

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Oh sweet friend! How true you are to say let’s make the most of the beautiful moments now.. I’m so glad that the teacher in you found this post to be a quality one. Sending love ♥

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  9. Dalo 2013

    This is an epic review of one of the finest poems I’ve ever known and wasn’t really aware that I knew it until I read your review. The poem itself is structured so perfectly, at least for my mind, the feeling of nature and its beauty and how such beauty is so shortly lived (the cycle of life) ~ you write about this so well. When I discovered your link with Ponyboy reciting this poem, I realized how I loved this poem as a kid, as the novel the Outsiders was one of my favorites as a kid…and the movie was great as well. Beautiful start to the day.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Ohhhhh! How wonderful to be able to bring back fond memories of the movie The Outsiders for you 🙂 I see that the book did not just touch my life.. and to remind you of the poem gives me a smile as it means you are reconnecting with good memories. Happy me to know this!

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      1. Dalo 2013

        The book was one of those epic reads, one of the first ‘mature’ books I got to read as a kid. It is funny, I had forgotten about the poem and when I saw your post it all came back (and it was great for you to add Ponyboy reciting it so well). Cheers to a great week ahead Christy 🙂

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  10. milliethom

    I must admit to never having heard this poem before, Christy, but your wonderfully thorough analysis of it has opened my eyes to the many complexities within it. To me, the overriding impression is that of nothing staying the same forever. What we have now, this very moment, should be enjoyed while it lasts. I really enjoyed reading about the various meanings of the word ‘gold’ and of the different cycles the poet alludes to. A lovely, meaningful post, altogether.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Exactly, this very moment is what counts the most.. so it is one to cherish.. thank you, Millie, for appreciating the collaborative post of Aquileana and I. Wishing you a lovely week ahead!

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  11. vivachange77

    Fascinating analysis and so well done, Christy. I love the Frost poem and the images that slip into each other as the lines progress and come full circle at the end. Thanks for pointing out the small details I missed.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Hello my friend! Firstly, I love being able to see your face now 🙂 Aww! So nice you know the poem and the analysis is helpful to you — hugs from Aquileana and I ♥

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  12. Cynthia

    Beautiful analysis. I love the explanation of what “gold” represents. I also learned more about poetic techniques – which I’d like to look more into sometime soon!
    Furthermore, I love your personal connection to it – it made me think of how much I like Poe’s “The Raven” that I memorized in high school (and have since forgotten, lol).
    And lastly, I’m into personality types lately, and had to google Frosts’s personality type. It’s hard to “dig up” and I”m still looking, but I’m willing to be he was an INFP or an INFJ.
    Hope you’re well sweet friend!

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Hi Cyndi!! How wonderful to see you here 🙂 I’m well, and hope you are too! Very sweet of you to drop by and I’ll visit you soon.. In the meantime The Raven is GREAT, I’m a fan of that poem too. Oooh Frost is surely the INF part but maybe more J than P.. let me know if you find out for sure 😉

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  13. roughwighting

    THANK YOU for the time and energy and wisdom you two gathered to highlight, explain, and celebrate Frost’s poem. I loved it when I first heard it several decades ago (though it did make me melancholy), and I re-read it too seldom. I agree with Frost’s premise of the poem; the theology in it (yes, to me it’s a type of theology) guides the way I live my life. I suppose from this poem we can go to CARPE DIEM – seize the day. Golden moments are so fleeting. xo

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  14. Resa

    I do know the poem, and the movie The Outsiders. I haven’t heard the poem for a long time. I am impressed with the analysis. Out of few words came many thoughts. He’s a genius, and I can’t help wonder if he consciously applied all you both have noted when he wrote this or any other poem. Or, did he just write in passion, his knowledge in reserve.
    I do remember the post on “Out Out”. I don’t know if I have a favorite poem of his, as I haven’t read them all. However, in harsh contrast to “Out Out” and trivial contrast to Nothing Gold Can Stay, I offer:

    Plowmen by Robert Frost

    A plow, they say, to plow the snow.
    They cannot mean to plant it, no–
    Unless in bitterness to mock
    At having cultivated rock.

    Thank you Christy & Aquileana!

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Hi Resa, Plowmen is a good choice and thank you for sharing it here with us today. It’s one of his earliest writes and like many of his poems, it lives on! I like that we were able to bring the poem back to you as you hadn’t read it in a while and tell you more about it too.. It’s our honour to be able to analyze Frost’s poem xx

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  15. Dave Small

    Hi Christy. Thanks for the analysis. This post was well worth time I spent on it. While there’s some sadness about the “gold” not lasting — my only real regret is not noticing it was “gold” at the time. This poem fills me with optimism knowing, at least for now, I have the opportunity to “seize the day” and maintain attentiveness to the new seasons of life.

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  16. Clanmother

    I have read this post more than once. Brilliant, insightful and fully integrated within our time. A reminder that our thoughts, words and longings continue after our last breath is taken. Thank you for using your gift of poetry to tell the story of our generation. Hugs

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  17. janellmithani

    Hi Christy, Wow! Such an in-depth and perceptive analysis of such a lovely poem. I didn’t remember it being in the Outsiders, but I read that book many moons ago when i was in school. Poetry always amazes me in that so many things can be “said” with so very few words.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      That’s neat that we both read The Outsiders in school 🙂 I do love the way words are so carefully chosen in poems like Frost’s and being able to analyze line by line.. Thanks for appreciating the work Aquileana and I put into this post xx

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  18. Pingback: ►Greek Mythology: “Flowers and Plants (I)” / Poetry: Frost´s “Nothing Gold Can Stay”, at Poetic Parfait 💫.- | La Audacia de Aquiles

  19. Ste J

    Talk about comprehensive, I’m not familiar with the poem or indeed too much poetry although now your book is on my bookshelf no doubt I will be getting into it soon. You have given me the taste for poetry and for attempting to dissect as you have so eloquently.

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        1. Christy B Post author

          I think that sometimes but then buy books on the spot… The new reads I come across excite me.. So I go ahead with the buys and then realize oh no I have a LOT of books to read first on my list.. oh dear…! I hope you have better luck than me 😉

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  20. Sue Dreamwalker

    Wow Christy.. what an amazing post.. yes the poem was indeed new to me.. but your analysis of it is masterful.
    Loved every paragraph of it.. And yes totally agree with its conclusion too.. Those Golden moments are with family and loved your addition of family photo’s
    Stay Happy within the arms of LOVED ONES..
    Hugs Sue ❤ xxx

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Awww Sue ♥♥♥ You are so sweet to take the time here and savor the words with Aquileana and I. Thank you for appreciating our project here. Let’s enjoy golden moments this weekend with loved ones, just as you say. I love your new photo too!!

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  21. theburningheart

    An exhaustive thesis, covering every possible angle, of the poem, great post Christy!
    By the way the pictures with your parents, you look like a chip of the old block. 🙂

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    1. Christy B Post author

      I’m smiling at the compliment with my parents – thank you! I adore them xx I am thankful for your visit here and happy you liked the analysis. I’ll be over soon to visit you too 🙂

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  22. Pingback: Analysis of the Poem ‘Nothing Gold Can Stay’ by Robert Frost | O LADO ESCURO DA LUA

  23. the dune mouse

    brilliant analysis of course dear Christy. That poem speaks to me the same way much of Dylan Thomas’ does. Perhaps because I’m getting older and I feel the poignancy of time in a keener way.
    (I have been having much trouble with WordPress lately, some blogs not showing up in my reader, slow loading posts, sites and comment sections- it seems random as well and the time involved sometimes precludes me from making comments at all- arghh).

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    1. Christy B Post author

      Oh WP problems can be frustrating.. I hope it all smooths over for you soon.. I’m glad you are back xx This poem is one dear to my heart so it is very nice to have you take time reading through the post and enjoying it with Aquileana and I 🙂

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  24. Inese Poga Art plus Life

    You have done a very careful analysis. It certainly deserves respect. I loved poetry during high school and University years to a great extent. The only aspect of learning and teaching poetry I did not like was the analysis part. I found that this was quite often driven by a personality of that one who analysed and sometimes I thought why couldn’t we leave the lines of a poet untouched in order they would live in somebody else’s mind as they were: intact and complete in their brilliance. I understood, however, that people who were dealing with the theoretical and psychological aspects of a poem anatomy simply had to take the poem apart in order to make clear what poetic tools and what psychological mechanisms create the adorable flare of some poem. There’s a lot analysis about art, as well. I liked when an artist who was asked complex questions about creation of his masterworks answered: I just put paints on canvas. Anyway, like I said, you did a very deep analysis, and that requires both knowledge and ability to incorporate the poet’s approach into one’s perception, which was done amazingly.

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    1. Christy B Post author

      So true that sometimes it is nice just to enjoy the creative venture without pulling it apart to analyze it, whether it be a painting, poem, or another piece of art. I loved your views here, Insese ♥

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  25. Pingback: Book Reviews and Other Updates from the Writer’s Desk | Poetic Parfait

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